Ir al contenido principal

Guerra del Volúmen (Loudness War)






Cuando Metallica edito su trabajo "Death Magnetic" este fue incluido en el programa Guitar Hero, quienes tenían esa versión y fueron a comprar el CD se encontraron en este último con un sonido distinto donde todo los niveles estaban al máximo, muchos se quejaron con la compañía y con la banda pero estos no dieron marcha atrás.
Después se comenzó a percibir que en todas las remasterizaciones ocurría lo mismo, el sentido es que la música que hoy se edita o reedita esta hecha para sordos, dicho de otro modo se eleva el sonido para que quién va en la calle con auriculares escuchando musica no se pierda ninguna frecuencia debido al sonido ambiente, tráfico, etc.
Comparen cualquier CD de los noventa y van a poder percibir la diferencia.
lo probé con el tema Northstar editado en Exposure (1979) de Robert Fripp ya que tengo el original y la versión doble remasterizada, la segunda brilla mas pero el sonido es mas plano.
Personalmente me quedo con los trabajos sin aplicarles la reducción de rango dinámico

Hay bastante material al respecto en la red les dejo una nota de gente que sabe:
http://www.sonidoyaudio.com/sya/vp-tid:2-pid:20-mastering_de_audio__la_guerra_del_volumen.html
la definición que encontramos en Wikipedia
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guerra_del_volumen http://tinyurl.com/stop-loudness-war

Para chequear los niveles de nuestros CD's http://tinyurl.com/tt-loudness-meter
A valorar los CDs de los noventa que zafan de esta cuestión.

Hola, soy moe, no puedo poner todo este texto en los comentarios así que lo ingreso aquí. Este es un artículo publicado en la revista Rolling Stone, en Diciembre de 2007. Está muy bueno, se los recomiendo, aunque está en inglés.
The Death of High Fidelity In the age of MP3s, sound quality is worse than ever
David Bendeth, a producer who works with rock bands like Hawthorne Heights and Paramore, knows that the albums he makes are often played through tiny computer speakers by fans who are busy surfing the Internet. So he's not surprised when record labels ask the mastering engineers who work on his CDs to crank up the sound levels so high that even the soft parts sound loud. Over the past decade and a half, a revolution in recording technology has changed the way albums are produced, mixed and mastered — almost always for the worse. "They make it loud to get [listeners'] attention," Bendeth says. Engineers do that by applying dynamic range compression, which reduces the difference between the loudest and softest sounds in a song. Like many of his peers, Bendeth believes that relying too much on this effect can obscure sonic detail, rob music of its emotional power and leave listeners with what engineers call ear fatigue. "I think most everything is mastered a little too loud," Bendeth says. "The industry decided that it's a volume contest." Producers and engineers call this "the loudness war," and it has changed the way almost every new pop and rock album sounds. But volume isn't the only issue. Computer programs like Pro Tools, which let audio engineers manipulate sound the way a word processor edits text, make musicians sound unnaturally perfect. And today's listeners consume an increasing amount of music on MP3, which eliminates much of the data from the original CD file and can leave music sounding tinny or hollow. "With all the technical innovation, music sounds worse," says Steely Dan's Donald Fagen, who has made what are considered some of the best-sounding records of all time. "God is in the details. But there are no details anymore." The idea that engineers make albums louder might seem strange: Isn't volume controlled by that knob on the stereo? Yes, but every setting on that dial delivers a range of loudness, from a hushed vocal to a kick drum — and pushing sounds toward the top of that range makes music seem louder. It's the same technique used to make television commercials stand out from shows. And it does grab listeners' attention — but at a price. Last year, Bob Dylan told Rolling Stone that modern albums "have sound all over them. There's no definition of nothing, no vocal, no nothing, just like — static." In 2004, Jeff Buckley's mom, Mary Guibert, listened to the original three-quarter-inch tape of her son's recordings as she was preparing the tenth-anniversary reissue of Grace. "We were hearing instruments you've never heard on that album, like finger cymbals and the sound of viola strings being plucked," she remembers. "It blew me away because it was exactly what he heard in the studio." To Guibert's disappointment, the remastered 2004 version failed to capture these details. So last year, when Guibert assembled the best-of collection So Real: Songs From Jeff Buckley, she insisted on an independent A&R consultant to oversee the reissue process and a mastering engineer who would reproduce the sound Buckley made in the studio. "You can hear the distinct instruments and the sound of the room," she says of the new release. "Compression smudges things together." Too much compression can be heard as musical clutter; on the Arctic Monkeys' debut, the band never seems to pause to catch its breath. By maintaining constant intensity, the album flattens out the emotional peaks that usually stand out in a song. "You lose the power of the chorus, because it's not louder than the verses," Bendeth says. "You lose emotion." The inner ear automatically compresses blasts of high volume to protect itself, so we associate compression with loudness, says Daniel Levitin, a professor of music and neuroscience at McGill University and author of This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession. Human brains have evolved to pay particular attention to loud noises, so compressed sounds initially seem more exciting. But the effect doesn't last. "The excitement in music comes from variation in rhythm, timbre, pitch and loudness," Levitin says. "If you hold one of those constant, it can seem monotonous." After a few minutes, research shows, constant loudness grows fatiguing to the brain. Though few listeners realize this consciously, many feel an urge to skip to another song. "If you limit range, it's just an assault on the body," says Tom Coyne, a mastering engineer who has worked with Mary J. Blige and Nas. "When you're fifteen, it's the greatest thing — you're being hammered. But do you want that on a whole album?" To an average listener, a wide dynamic range creates a sense of spaciousness and makes it easier to pick out individual instruments — as you can hear on recent albums such as Dylan's Modern Times and Norah Jones' Not Too Late. "When people have the courage and the vision to do a record that way, it sets them apart," says Joe Boyd, who produced albums by Richard Thompson and R.E.M.'s Fables of the Reconstruction. "It sounds warm, it sounds three-dimensional, it sounds different. Analog sound to me is more emotionally affecting." Rock and pop producers have always used compression to balance the sounds of different instruments and to make music sound more exciting, and radio stations apply compression for technical reasons. In the days of vinyl rec- ords, there was a physical limit to how high the bass levels could go before the needle skipped a groove. CDs can handle higher levels of loudness, although they, too, have a limit that engineers call "digital zero dB," above which sounds begin to distort. Pop albums rarely got close to the zero-dB mark until the mid-1990s, when digital compressors and limiters, which cut off the peaks of sound waves, made it easier to manipulate loudness levels. Intensely compressed albums like Oasis' 1995 (What's the Story) Morning Glory? set a new bar for loudness; the songs were well-suited for bars, cars and other noisy environments. "In the Seventies and Eighties, you were expected to pay attention," says Matt Serletic, the former chief executive of Virgin Records USA, who also produced albums by Matchbox Twenty and Collective Soul. "Modern music should be able to get your attention." Adds Rob Cavallo, who produced Green Day's American Idiot and My Chemical Romance's The Black Parade, "It's a style that started post-grunge, to get that intensity. The idea was to slam someone's face against the wall. You can set your CD to stun." It's not just new music that's too loud. Many remastered recordings suffer the same problem as engineers apply compression to bring them into line with modern tastes. The new Led Zeppelin collection, Mothership, is louder than the band's original albums, and Bendeth, who mixed Elvis Presley's 30 #1 Hits, says that the album was mastered too loud for his taste. "A lot of audiophiles hate that record," he says, "but people can play it in the car and it's competitive with the new Foo Fighters record." Just as cds supplanted vinyl and cassettes, MP3 and other digital-music formats are quickly replacing CDs as the most popular way to listen to music. That means more conven- ience but worse sound. To create an MP3, a computer samples the music on a CD and compresses it into a smaller file by excluding the musical information that the human ear is less likely to notice. Much of the information left out is at the very high and low ends, which is why some MP3s sound flat. Cavallo says that MP3s don't reproduce reverb well, and the lack of high-end detail makes them sound brittle. Without enough low end, he says, "you don't get the punch anymore. It decreases the punch of the kick drum and how the speaker gets pushed when the guitarist plays a power chord." But not all digital-music files are created equal. Levitin says that most people find MP3s ripped at a rate above 224 kbps virtually indistinguishable from CDs. (iTunes sells music as either 128 or 256 kbps AAC files — AAC is slightly superior to MP3 at an equivalent bit rate. Amazon sells MP3s at 256 kbps.) Still, "it's like going to the Louvre and instead of the Mona Lisa there's a 10-megapixel image of it," he says. "I always want to listen to music the way the artists wanted me to hear it. I wouldn't look at a Kandinsky painting with sunglasses on." Producers also now alter the way they mix albums to compensate for the limitations of MP3 sound. "You have to be aware of how people will hear music, and pretty much everyone is listening to MP3," says producer Butch Vig, a member of Garbage and the producer of Nirvana's Never- mind. "Some of the effects get lost. So you sometimes have to over-exaggerate things." Other producers believe that intensely compressed CDs make for better MP3s, since the loudness of the music will compensate for the flatness of the digital format. As technological shifts have changed the way sounds are recorded, they have encouraged an artificial perfection in music itself. Analog tape has been replaced in most studios by Pro Tools, making edits that once required splicing tape together easily done with the click of a mouse. Programs like Auto-Tune can make weak singers sound pitch-perfect, and Beat Detective does the same thing for wobbly drummers. "You can make anyone sound professional," says Mitchell Froom, a producer who's worked with Elvis Costello and Los Lobos, among others. "But the problem is that you have something that's professional, but it's not distinctive. I was talking to a session drummer, and I said, 'When's the last time you could tell who the drummer is?' You can tell Keith Moon or John Bonham, but now they all sound the same." So is music doomed to keep sounding worse? Awareness of the problem is growing. The South by Southwest music festival recently featured a panel titled "Why Does Today's Music Sound Like Shit?" In August, a group of producers and engineers founded an organization called Turn Me Up!, which proposes to put stickers on CDs that meet high sonic standards. But even most CD listeners have lost interest in high-end stereos as surround-sound home theater systems have become more popular, and superior-quality disc formats like DVD-Audio and SACD flopped. Bendeth and other producers worry that young listeners have grown so used to dynamically compressed music and the thin sound of MP3s that the battle has already been lost. "CDs sound better, but no one's buying them," he says. "The age of the audiophile is over."
Sounding Off on the Sound Wars: Top Producers and Artists Speak Out
"This is what I think is happening: Everybody has iPods, so you can't get them that loud. So they have a algorithm called a "finalizer" — it's not that new, but the way people are using it is new — and it makes your music sound louder. People will ruin their records and CDs. I was really stunned by the CD the guy gave me when I listened to it at home — it sounded crazy! It was like, abort mission! Supposedly it sounds fine on your iPod, but if you take the CD and put it on your hi-fi CD player you can hear the digital clipping. It's a big news story over in England." — Kim Deal, on mastering the new Breeders album, Mountain Battles
"Compression is a necessary evil. The artists I know want to sound competitive. You don't want your track to sound quieter or wimpier by comparison. We've raised the bar and you can't really step back." — Butch Vig, producer and Garbage mastermind "We're conforming to the way machines pay music. It's robots' choice. It used to be ladies' choice — now it's robots' choice." — Donald Fagen, producer and Steely Dan frontman
"I believe that if a vocalist is hyper-tuned, it's less personal. I have no aversion to using Auto-Tune when I have to. But I think listeners can hear it." — Brendan O'Brien, producer of Pearl Jam, Rage Against the Machine and Bruce Springtseen's The Rising and Magic
"I think there's been a huge shift in how people listen to music. They used to get as good a stereo as they could. Now they want an iPod. And the audiophiles have moved on to multimedia. But to get the content to people, you have to play by their rules." — Matt Serletic, Matchbox Twenty and Collective Soul producer and former chief executive, Virgin Records
"A&R people like the compressed aesthetic because they can take it to the radio. They think if they want to have a hit record they have to spend a lot of money so they want to cover themselves. But if you think about the classic records, none of them are squashed." — Mitchell Froom, producer of albums by Los Lobos, Elvis Costello and others
"I find it quite interesting, and I think its instructive, that if you focus on one area of the music business — you could generally call it music for people over twenty-four — and you look at the last ten years and look at records that have come out of nowhere, that no one's putting any money behind and have takes off, the two things that come to mind are the Buena Vista Social Club and Norah Jones. And those records were made in the most old-fashioned ways you can imagine." — Joe Boyd, producer of several Richard Thompson albums and R.E.M.'s Fables of the Reconstruction
"I cant tell you how many times someone comes in and plays me something he wants mastered and I'll say, 'Do you want to make it slamming loud or retain some of this great sound?' They'll say, 'We want to keep it really pristine.' Then the next day they'll call me and say, 'How come mine isn't as loud as so and so's?' " — Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer "With the Beatles or Rolling Stones, they'd be a little sharp or flat, but no one would care — that was rock. Now if someone's out of tune or out of time, they treat it as a mistake and correct it." — Ted Jensen, mastering engineer
ROBERT LEVINE
Y a continuación, el video del que hablé en el comentario que hice (que está abajo)

Comentarios

  1. Es todo un tema ese, incluso si uno agudiza el oído, hay cosas que son muy notorias sin necesidad de gráficos de frecuencias. En la Loudnness los que se pierde es fundamentalmente calidad de sonido (justamente lo que propiciamos en este blog donde publicamos en lossless).
    Una gran ventaja de los registros nacionales y en general de América latina es que las grabaciones no están "perilladas", si uno escucha, por ejemplo, los álbums de William Gray y los compara con el de Metallica, por ejemplo (pero puede ser la mayoría de registros americanos o europeos, que están gananciados aunque no tanto a ese extremo) puede notar la diferencia, el sonido es más limpio, se pueden apreciar mejor cada instrumento, porque las frecuencias están puras.

    ResponderEliminar
  2. Sigo con el tema, que lo tenía en el tintero desde hace mucho. Gracias Artie por tomarlo y publicarlo.
    Se ha venido comentando ya hace un buen tiempo la perniciosa tendencia de ciertos productores, de otorgarle mayor ganancia a la amplitud sonora de las grabaciones en post-producción digital. De esta forma, hacen que el disco suene más "fuerte" y tenga, por tanto, mayor contundencia en los ambientes donde realmente la masa va a azotarse cual ganado al matadero, léase discos, salsotecas, reguetonecas o como m... se llamen.
    Desgraciadamente, esta "moda", más la proliferación de dispositivos que permiten "llevar la música a todas partes" en el menor espacio posible, para poder escucharla en los ambientes más acústicamente polutos posibles, ha significado un deterioro en la calidad del audio, limitándose a sólo sonar más "juerte" mientras más watts pmpo tenga la radio o el bicho en el que ese pobre cristiano escucha las atrocidades de su predilección.
    Para poder entender un poco más de lo que les estoy hablando, les recomiendo que vean a continuación este videíto que encontré:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3Gmex_4hreQ

    (Mejor lo pongo en el contenido del post para que lo puedan ver sin necesidad de pasar a otra página)

    ResponderEliminar
    Respuestas
    1. Sabes Moe que otro tema bueno para desarrollar es el Jitter que se da en muchos CD's a 16 bits.
      Un día me quise sacar la duda de porque a veces pongo un CD y voy pasando los tracks sin dejar terminar los temas, no como antes pasaba con los vinilos que los dejaba de comienzo a fin (si esto era por la comodidad de tener un control remoto o por otro motivo).
      Buscando por la red me encontre el tema del jitter que se da en los muestreos y que aparentemente es el un defecto en la reproducción que hace que uno no pueda seguir escuchando.
      En fin!! cada loco con su tema como decía Serrat.
      Saludos!!

      Eliminar

Publicar un comentario

Lo más visto de la semana pasada

Mahavishnu Orchestra - The Complete Columbia Albums Collection (2011)

#Músicaparaelencierro. LightbulbSun ya nos había presentado el "Original Album Series" de Billy Cobham y nos había prometido esto que publicamos ahora, bien para un viernes en el blog cabezón, y para que tengan para disfrutar en todo el fin de semana. Y ya su título nos lo dice todo, por lo que no me parece necesario agregarle muchas más palabras, con tanta música a disposición. Esta colección contiene versiones remasterizadas de todos los álbums de la primera encarnación de la banda, incluido "The Lost Trident Sessions", que sería el tercer álbum de estudio de la Mahavishnu, grabado en 1973 pero solo lanzado en 1999. Además, "The Inner Mounting Flame" contiene un tema adicional, el álbum en vivo "Between Nothingness & Eternity" fue remezclado y ampliado, y la caja incluye un CD en vivo inédito llamado "Unreleased Tracks from Between Nothingness & Eternity". Creo que está todo dicho, los incondicionales de la Mahavishnu estarán…

Billy Cobham & Colin Towns & HR Big Band - Meeting Of The Spirits (2006)

#Músicaparaelencierro. Jorge N. nos vuelve a deleitar mientras nos dice: "Ya que andaban dando vueltas algunas cosas de Billy Cobham, se me ocurrió pasarte un disco del susodicho, con la Big Band de Colin Towns (tiene unas cuantas cosas muy recomendables, entre ellas un disco con temas de Zappa), con temas de la Mahavishnu. Para mi gusto es un disco espectacular, digno de estar en la biblioteca cabezona...". Dicho y hecho, aquí lo tenemos para presentar una nueva versión de las canciones de la Mahavishnu Orchestra. Una nueva versión de temas ya conocidos, re comuestos e interpretados por músicos de primer nivel. Esta vez los músicos en juego han llevado esta música a una dimensión aún más lejana que la de los temas originales. Seguramente el guitarrista de Mahavishnu, John McLaughlin (quien escribió algunas de las notas para este disco) nunca esperó escuchar sus composiciones interpretadas por una Big Band, y ha comentado que la música en este disco es una revelación para él…

Derribar la Clausura de un "Mundo Muerto"

Protestas populares y sentidos de lo común en tiempos de pandemia, rutas de fuga, revuelta y re-existencia en América Latina: La pandemia del nuevo coronavirus ha saturado absolutamente todo. Incluso la memoria, que ya venía siendo atropellada y convulsionada permanentemente por el eterno presente de esta sociedad hiper-informada, inundada de datos, imágenes, video-cápsulas, memes y múltiples acontecimientos impactantes. Así que, como un acto para recobrar el aliento, como quien sofocado se quita el tapabocas para tomar una bocanada de aire fresco, hagamos nuevamente memoria de vida, recordemos los meses y semanas atrás, que determinaron todo 2019: calles calientes, millones de voces; marchas, piquetes, pancartas, consignas, pañuelos, enjambres, multitudes. Corazones latiendo, rabia, anhelo, hartazgo, esperanza. Chile, Ecuador, Colombia, Haití, Perú, Honduras, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Nicaragua; y fuera de las tierras del Abya Yala, Hong Kong, Francia, Irak, Líbano…

Luis Alberto Spinetta - Un Mañana (2008)

#Musicaparaelencierro. Algo que estabamos debiendo desde hace un tiempo y viene bien para empezar un día de mal clima y mucho virus. Hay que ponerles ganas y qué mejor que algo del Flaco, y gracias al aporte de José Ramón que sigue contribuyendo al salvataje de sus conciencias y su psiquismo a fuerza de pura música... Y nada menos que con un disco que fue Gardel De Oro, votado como el mejor disco del año y nominado para el Grammy Latino. El Flaco, fue cantante, guitarrista, poeta y compositor como ningún otro logró ser, y este no es sino otro ejemplo de ello.

Artista: Luis Alberto Spinetta
Álbum: Un Mañana
Año: 2008
Género: Rock
Duración: 56:41
Nacionalidad: Argentina

Les dejo otro del Flaco:

Un mañana es el decimotercero y último álbum de estudio de Luis Alberto Spinetta grabado en el año 2008. Mantiene una marcada línea jazz-rock. El corte de promoción fue Preso Ventanilla, del cuál salió un video-clip. El álbum fue elegido el mejor del año en una encuesta realizada por la website Rock.co…

Hijos de Puta Disfrazados de Libertarios

En medio de la pandemia dan rienda suelta a su fibra libertaria. ¿Serán un nuevo grupo anarquista?. Así parece. Disfrazados de Robespierre se lanzan contra el estatismo del gobierno que ha decretado que estamos ante "la hora del Estado", así se despliegan columnistas de Clarín, Infobae y La Nación mientras desarrollan una oposición radicalizada sea como sea y sin lógica que importe (su descalificación mediática a la política sanitaria choca con las evidencias locales y mundiales). Así se suman en los medios concentrados al relato confuso de periodistas que exigen control como en países comunistas, libertades como en países de reducida población, aperturas de la cuarentena como en países que ya están en la reducción de la curva de contagios, producción como en un mundo ideal que ya no existe, rebeliones fiscales como en ningún modelo, siguiendo el ejemplo de la pulsión por la muerte de la derecha que remite a los cercanos y actuales de Trump y Bolsonaro, que presencian como s…

Áuryn - Antes de Cerrar los Ojos (2020)

#Músicaparaelencierro. Luego de varios años de idas, venidas, retrasos, grabaciones, separaciones, producción y demoras varias, al fin nos llega el LP de Áuryn, una gran banda que habíamos presentado en el blog cabezón cuando apenas eran unos purretes. Hoy se traen un magnífico trabajo bajo el brazo, por lo que demuestran que la espera valió la pena: mucha destreza, ritmo, potencia, melodía, buen gusto, poesía,en una explosión de creatividad, destreza, energía, imaginación y buen gusto. Por eso, ya es hora de dejar de lamentarse porque su disolución representaba un gran disco que había quedado en el veremos, al fin podemos escuchar a estos grandes músicos y sumamos otro nuevo y gran disco a nuestra colección de discos recomendados. Tremendo trabajo recomendado al 100%. Un disco que parece destinado a erigirse como uno de los más notables ítems de prog argentino del presente (y apestado) año 2020. A no perdérselo!

Artista: Áuryn
Álbum: Antes de Cerrar los Ojos
Año: 2020
Género: Heavy prog
D…

Mapa de campañas solidarias y ollas comunes en Chile

Para los cabezones chilenos. Las integrantes de Fundación Vértice, organización sin fines de lucro e interdisciplinar de mujeres dedicadas a los estudios urbanos y territoriales, todas egresadas de la U. de Chile, desarrollaron este acervo informativo en constante construcción, el cual busca dar a conocer diversas iniciativas en todo el país trasandino. Fue con la llegada de la pandemia y proyectando las consecuencias económicas y sociales de la misma, que interrumpieron su despliegue en el ámbito de estudios urbanos para dedicarse a desarrollar este mapa interactivo


“Somos todas ex estudiantes de la Facultad de Arquitectura y Urbanismo de la U. de Chile (FAU), de las tres carreras: geografía, arquitectura y diseño. Sentimos la necesidad de hacer investigación aplicada ligada a los estudios urbanos y territoriales, y creamos Fundación Vértice, con el propósito de contribuir al debate sobre la ciudad y el hábitat”, cuenta Paulina Gatica, una de las integrantes y fundadoras de Vért…

Frank Zappa - Waka / Jawaka (1972)

#Musicaparaelencierro. Zappa parecia estar avanzando hacia un tipo mas elaborado de musica, explorando y creando nuevis pasajes de sonido, color e intensidad. Una continuación de "Hot Rats" que define la trilogía junto con "The Grand Wazoo", un disco con mucho jazz-rock en la línea de "Bitches Brew" o "In a Silent Way" de Miles Davis y de los primeros grupos que se registran en éste género, y las comparaciones van más allá de los musical, porque el genio inquieto de Zappa -al igual que como Miles- le impedía permanecer mucho tiempo haciendo lo mismo (hormigas en el culo dirían algunos). Más Zappa ahora de parte de Carlos el Menduco para que disfruten a lo grande, y que no se olviden del blog cabezón...  otro de los imprescindibles de Zappa y que conforma la gran trilogía jazzística de nuestro Frankie querido.

Artista: Frank Zappa Álbum: Waka/Jawaka
Año: 1972
Género: Rock / Progressive rock / Experimental / Jazz / Psychedelic rock
Duración: 36:08
Naci…

Chulpa - Vidala del Monte (2020)

#Músicaparaelencierro. El Mago Alberto se viene con un disco bien de viernes. Muchas veces hemos presentado interesantísimos proyectos argentos que unen el folcklore con el metal y el prog, y los ejemplos de aquellos grupos que han aterrizado en el blog cabezón son innumerables, pudiendo nombrar a grupos como Raza Truncka, Arraigo, Solsticio, Alter Ego y muchísimos otros, inclusive, algunos de ellos crearon el sello Rocklore, que congrega el arte desde una mirada latinoamericana y que reúne artistas y gestores culturales en un sello de gestión colectiva. Hoy seguimos con esa tónica pero desde una mirada diferente, más inclunado al punk (ojo, incluso no tanto) y de la mano de Joana Gieco, que no es sino la hija de León Gieco (multiinstrumentista y tecladista en la banda de Ricardo Iorio) desde el proyecto "Chulpa", en un disco que recién sale a la luz y que no puede quedar fuera del blog cabezón! Otro sorpresita para que conozcan y disfruten este din de semana.

Artista: Chulpa

Genesis - Genesis (1983)

#Musicaparaelencierro. Lisandro nos presenta este disco que estaba fuera de la discografía publicada en el blog cabezón, hasta ahora. Y corresponde a la continuación de "Abacab", con su sonido modernizado y ochentoso, el cambio del progresivo a un sonido mas accesible para las masas y radiable a traves de la todopoderosa FM, dejando de lado las orquestaciones, el sinfonismo y los arreglos ambientales que tanto se dejaban apreciar en los albumes de los 70's. También la partida de Steve Hackett en la guitarra fue un duro golpe a la creatividad de los Genesis de mediados de los 70's en adelante. Aquí viene bien lo que publicó Raúl cuando presentó ese disco: "Lo bueno del arte, en cualquiera de sus vertientes, es la diversidad de opiniones. ABACAB representa un cambio fundamental en las técnicas de grabación. lógicamente de la mano del nuevo productor de Genesis, Hugh Padgham. En esta fase reconozco el valor de ese álbum. Pero casi todo Genesis tiene belleza de dist…

Ideario del arte y política cabezona

Ideario del arte y política cabezona


"La desobediencia civil es el derecho imprescriptible de todo ciudadano. No puede renunciar a ella sin dejar de ser un hombre".

Gandhi, Tous les hommes sont frères, Gallimard, 1969, p. 235.