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Jethro Tull - Living in the Past (1972)

Artista: Jethro Tull
Álbum: Living in the Past
Año: 1972
Género: Folk progresivo
Duración: 80:01
Nacionalidad: Inglaterra


Lista de Temas:
1. Song For Jeffrey
2. Love Story
3. Christmas Song
4. Living In The Past
5. Driving Song
6. Bourée
7. Sweet Dream
8. Singing All Day
9. Teacher
10. Witch's Promise
11. Alive And Well And Living In
12. Just Trying To Be
13. By Kind Permission Of (live)
14. Dharma For One (live)
15. Wond'ring Again
16. Hymn 43
17. Life Is A Long Song
18. Up The 'Pool
19. Dr. Bogenbroom
20. For Later
21. Nursie

Alineación:
- Ian Anderson / flute, balalaika, mandolin, Hammond organ, acoustic guitar, vocals
- Mick Abrahams / electric guitar (plays on tracks 1 - 3)
- Martin Barre / electric guitar (plays on tracks 4 - 21)
- Clive Bunker / drums, glockenspiel, percussion (plays on tracks 1 - 11 and 13 - 16)
- Glenn Cornick / bass, Hammond organ (plays on tracks 1 - 11 and 13 - 15)
- John Evans / celeste, piano (plays on tracks 9 - 21)
- Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond / bass, backing vocals (plays on tracks 16 - 21)
- Barriemore Barlow / drums (plays on tracks 17 - 21)
- David Palmer / orchestral arrangement and conducting (plays on track 7)


Otra vez un aporte tulliano de Carlos el Mendocino Tullero.
Pese a poder considerarlo como una compilación de temas aparecidos en singles y algún registro en vivo, "Living In The Past" es casi (ojo, casi) un álbum más de estudio. Es una muy interesante colección de temas que definen muy bien la primera etapa de la banda. Incluso yo diría que como disco de recopilación es uno de los mejores que se hayan grabado jamás, porque no hay rellenos, y encima es un álbum doble.

Living in the Past ("Viviendo en el pasado") es un álbum doble pseudo-recopilatorio que reúne una serie de singles, caras B y temas inéditos hasta esa fecha del grupo inglés de rock progresivo Jethro Tull.
El álbum tomó su nombre del single homónimo, Living in the Past, publicado en 1969 e incluido, a su vez, en esta recopilación.
El disco se presentaba en una elaborado estuche que contenía un gran cuadernillo con más de 50 fotos de la banda (las posteriores reediciones en CD sólo incluyeron una pequeña parte de las mismas) y cuya cubierta ha pasado a ser una de las más famosas de la banda (junto a las de Aqualung y Thick as a Brick.
Además de los singles recopilados, dos temas, "By Kind Permission of" y "Dharma for One", fueron grabados en vivo en el Carnegie Hall, en una actuación el 4 de noviembre de 1970. El resto de los temas de esta actuación serían recogidos, años después, en el disco dos del box set The 25th Anniversary Boxed Set (1993).
Las diferencias en la elección de los temas publicados entre la versión británica y la estadounidense del disco dieron origen a nuevas versiones en CD, dependiendo del sitio de origen. Una reedición en CD de 1994 omitió varias canciones ("Bourée" y "Teacher", por ejemplo), para reducir la duración total y poder editarlo en un solo disco. También hay diferencias según los países de publicación.
Una nueva edición en dos discos de Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab contiene todas y cada una de las canciones del disco original, incluidas aquellas que fueron añadidas más tarde en distintas ediciones nacionales.
El álbum llegó a alcanzar el tercer puesto en las listas de Billboard y fue disco de oro al poco de publicarse.
El tema que da nombre al disco fue el primer Top 40 de la historia de la banda en los Estados Unidos.
Por otra parte, el tema "Witch's Promise" había sido el primer single en estéreo de la historia, aunque el primer LP en estéreo había sido Sgt. Pepper's, de los Beatles, publicado antes.
Wikipedia

Y así empezamos el día... les dejo algunos comentarios y vamos el disco porque como es viernes tenemos varias cosas para traerles, para que se diviertan en el fin de semana. Ah! y la semana que viene estoy de vacaciones así que va a menguar la actividad del blog, pero no se preocupen que somos como el sol, siempre estaremos acá.

Listen to this collection, put together to capitalize on the explosive growth in the group's audience after Aqualung, and it's easy to understand just how fine a group Jethro Tull was in the early '70s. Most of the songs, apart from a few heavily played album tracks ("Song for Jeffrey," etc.) and a pair of live tracks from a 1970 Carnegie Hall show, came off of singles and EPs that, apart from the title song, were scarcely known in America, and it's all so solid that it needs no apology or explanation. Not only was Ian Anderson writing solid songs every time out, but the group's rhythm section was about the best in progressive rock's pop division. Along with any of the group's first five albums, this collection is seminal and essential to any Tull collection, and the only compilation by the group that is a must-own disc.
Bruce Eder

An earlier reviewer notes that this album is a "collection of previously released music.... Kind of like Tulls (sic) Physical Graffiti." (For the record, that excellent Led Zeppelin album was original, new material.) While this album is a compilation of sorts, it was cobbled together mostly from British-only singles, so most of the material (apart from the terrific "A Song for Jeffrey," "Inside," and "Hymn 43") won't be on any of your other Tull discs (not counting M.U. and Repeat). There is also a longer, re-worked and re-worded version of Aqualung's lovely "Wond'ring Aloud," (here called "Wond'ring Again") that I actually prefer to the original.
That being said, this is one of my favourite classic Tull albums. The disc has 19 tracks, and while I can't claim to love them all (the two live songs, "By Kind Permission of" and "Dharma for One" don't do much for me), I find the rest of them to be essential listening for this long-time fan, and thus give this release a four-star rating. My particular favourites include "Love Story," "Christmas Song," the indispensable title track, "Driving Song," "Witches Promise," "Life is a Long Song" and "Nursie." There, that's at least eight really good Jethro Tull songs that I wouldn't otherwise have!
A must-have for fans of the older Jethro Tull (the band, that is, not the 19th Century agriculturalist!)
Peter

How a band could make a single and still not sell-out. Although this is a compilation (of all the singles they put out in the early years , and believe they knew how to make a good sounding single) , this is an absolute must-have for all fans. The title track is a quirky 5/4 tune, Christmas Song is probably the best song on that album, etc..... The first disc is clearly the better one with Tull pumping/churning out superb hits with all the exciting enthusiasm the crazy mad flauter/Tramp could inject in his songs!
Side 3 is of some interest as it is live (there were no live Tull albums available until the much later Bursting Out, but this is with a totally different line-up) but too bad one of those two tracks is an excuse for a drum solo and the other for a lengthy piano solo.
The luxurious looking package was as delightful as ThickAAB was. There is also one track from each studio album up to Aqualung. I must say the stuff on side 4 is less captivating (the songwriting is maybe not as vibrant) but still very worthy.
Sean Trane

A collection of nonalbum B sides, A sides that differed from their elpee counterparts, live tracks and unreleased gems. Not odds and sods by any means, "Living In The Past" returned to what some felt were the band's glory days, before Ian started to lay things on a little Thick. Me, I could have lived without the live "By Kind Permission Of", but the remaining songs make this a more rewarding purchase than TULL's first three records (which were themselves no slouches). The only knock on this compilation is that the sense of discovery, which each new TULL album seemed to promise, is here replaced by a sense of rediscovery. With "Aqualung" and Thick As A Brick, Ian and the band had vaunted past the technical accomplishments present here, and a certain measure of recycling ("Wond'ring Again", "Up The 'Pool") tempers the wonder these songs might have originally inspired. I won't give you a song-by-song breakdown (where would the fun be in that?), but I will pull out a few diamonds for inspection. There are, first, the classics you might have missed: "Living In The Past", "Life Is A Long Song", "Witches Promise" and "Sweet Dream". Easier to obtain but always welcome are "Teacher" (one of two tracks deleted from the single CD reissue), "Hymn 43" and "Inside" (which didn't appear on the original Reprise double elpee, go figure). Next are what for many will be new discoveries: that sober antidote to the Christmas spirit, "Christmas Song", "Love Story" (the last single with Mick ABRAHAMS), and a radical live treatment of "Dharma For One" that now included lyrics. The remaining tracks are often pleasant acoustic throwaways, not unlike the little bits that Ian slipped into "Aqualung".
Although it fills in most of the gaps between "This Was" and "Aqualung", "Living In The Past" is rightfully a repast on its own. If you haven't heard it, I envy you the discoveries that lie ahead in this tome of wonder. (And speaking of discoveries, it seems that some people took Ian's joke about smoking fingernail clippings to heart. Trust me, you do not want to try this at home unless you've got an air freshener handy.)
Dave Connolly

Until a couple of months ago I had not listened to this album since 1972. Although I had good memories of the music on this double-LP, which was released a few months after "Thick As A Brick", I had forgotten just how good an album it is. Although technically a compilation of non-album singles and other recordings from 1968 to 1971, there are only four tracks from previous studio albums so it was effectively a new release.
I happened to see the CD going for a pittance in a sale and bought it. Unfortunately it's a single CD and the track list is slightly different to the double-LP release: the four tracks 'Bourée', 'Teacher', 'Alive And Well And Living In' and 'Hymn 43' are missing, and the two tracks 'Inside' and 'Locomotive Breath' have been added. That still leaves over 74 minutes of great music on the CD, though. And the two latter tracks are crackers.
It's much more accessible than "Thick As A Brick" but, hey, each song is damn good. 'By Kind Permission Of' and 'Dharma For One' are live tracks from a 1970 concert at Carnegie Hall. As the name of the first of these might suggest, it's primarily a medley of classical pieces and jazz played by Evans on the piano (see if you can pick out the Debussy, Beethoven and Chopin), with flute accompaniment from Anderson. I suppose some might consider the track as filler (barroom piano), but I like this 10-minute track nevertheless.
I started writing this review thinking that I would rate this as a 4-star album (Excellent addition to any progressive music collection) but the music sounds so good to me that I just can't bring myself to give it anything less than 5 stars. When one has a TULL album with twenty-one excellent tracks (nineteen in the case of the CD) then how on Earth can I give it anything else? Glad I rediscovered this classic after all these years.
Fitzcarraldo

This double output was released in Brazil, in 1974, after the releasing of two great JT's epics ("Thick As A Brick" and "A Passion Play") and this chronology, different from other countries, resulted very interesting, maybe adequate - a relaxing bonanza time following the stormy and grandiose previous movements. Also "Living In The Past" listed a bunch of songs that weren't previously known by tupinikin* fans and so the Tull's aficionados treated this album as a recollection rather than a mere compilation. Good, but being double it doubled the price too and for teenager students the only way to get it was to make a consortium where every moment had to be enjoyed heavenly.
Being an album that contains works from different periods it's nice to observe that all principal band members form the line-up, all captained by the omnipresent Ian Anderson and all showing great skilful in a way that the listener is always feeling like gifted. "Living In The Past" could be more enjoyable if some weak tracks were replaced by others much more meaningful, although it's clear that this release was produced with the intention of not being a 'greatest hits' stuff. We didn't know at the time but this double album included mainly single releases (certainly in the UK).
'Song for Jeffrey', the opening track, is a typical JT's folky tune, proto-prog par excellence and also a great opener; flute playing is a registered mark. 'Love story' and 'Christmas song' do a good preparation for the title-track, a very catchy and pleasant one that got the dubious distinction of being a fairly radio broadcasted song, a real top-chart hit. 'Bouree', an adaptation of a Bach's theme is one of the highlights of the album - the jazzy mood is awesome and funny. 'Sweet dream' bears that mesmerizing Tull rhythm, splendid, probably the best song of this recollection.
Also great moments are: 'Teacher', a soft blues-rock, very agreeable; 'Alive and well and living in', with a great piano intro followed by a rarely heard smooth Anderson's voice; middle section of the song shows some interesting post-bossa-nova touches; 'Wond'ring again', a kind of ballad in accordance with JT's lexicon, also catchy and tasteful; 'Hymn 43', another highlight of the album; there's a perceptible pride in the way they play - yes, they're really proud of being progressive; 'Life's a long song', closes greatly the set of great tracks with a good smell of Donovan's stuff. Other songs are hearable but not necessarily unforgettable.
That's it: a great work, not a masterpiece but essential for any music collection.
Guigo

Tull's 'Living In The Past' is a semi-compilation album featuring a host of non-album tracks and singles, one track off each of the first 4 studio albums, and one side of Live material. It serves as a wonderful introduction to a really great band, and the selection of songs all display the versatility of the musicians involved. This covers their early years with their, somewhat 'simpler' approach to bluesy/folky rock music, although the Live tracks hint at what was to come....
'By Kind Permission Of' is composed by Keyboardist John Evan, and is mainly a fine performance on piano along with Anderson's virtuosic flute playing, demonstrating Evan's ability at tackling classical runs, with the rest of the band coming in at the end for a really exciting bash, albeit very brief. 'Dharma For One', originally a superb instrumental track of their debut 'This Was', is now twice as long, features vocals from Anderson and heavy- handed Hammond Organ playing from Evan, plus Clive Bunker's Drum solo, showing off 'double kick' with two bass drums, something that Cream's Ginger Baker revolutionised a couple of years earlier and wasn't heard too often at the time. The track 'Living In The Past' is a playful, jazzy tune in 5/4, showing Anderson's penchant for being clever AND catchy. The original double LP comes in a hard-cover Gatefold with a leather-like finish, and features a 20 page booklet full of colourful and amusing photo's of the band throughout their first few years of existence. An excellent addition for any music lover.
Tom

Let me start out by saying something that is a cornerstone, if not the whole damn stone, of my musicological philosophy. Compilations...suck. They are, in fact, for suck- ers, or people too lazy to actually research a band, and would rather stay with the safe radio hits (the same goes for people who just buy a band's "quintessential" album outright, but that's another review). Compilations rob the listener of the perhaps harder, but ultimately more rewarding experience of listening to REAL albums. No one ever actually needs to own any compilations whatsoever.
Now that that's out of the way, Living in the Past is a really, really, really good album. In fact, it's damn near essential. And not only is it a compilation, it's the king of all compilations. It contains everything a good compilation (since there are such things, despite my totalitarian attitude) should have: cuts off of concurrent albums, singles, A sides, B sides, outtakes and live numbers.
There are about twenty numbers, so it might be a bit difficult to go into all of them (oh, but don't let that stop me!). Suffice to say that Living has the most variety of almost any record in the Tull cannon (save for Thick, Stand Up and Horses perhaps); in fact, more variety than some bands are capable of producing in a lifetime (crappy bands of course, but crappy bands are people too!).
We start out with "Song For Jeffrey," one of my favorite songs off This Was. But it's all about the singles, man, the singles. "Love Story" is an innocent little blues rocker, the last number from the Abrahams days. "A Christmas Song" has its immortal final line, but the song itself is brilliant, sort of like a folksy version of some later bombastic symphonic progsters (Renaissance with a mandolin instead of a piano?).
"Living in the Past" is, for lack of a better candidate (in a good way, not a bad way), the best song of the album. It's a title track, right? Can't be that bad. It's got an infectious bassline, haunting flute, and cool lyrics.
Anyone who wants to really compare Tuller guitarists need only compare the relentless blues rocker "Driving Song" to its lighter predecessor "Love Story." Not that "Story" was a bad song, but Barre really leads the band with his fuzzy, aggressive riffage. "Sweet Dream" is an over the top orchestral rocker, with terrifying vocal delivery ala Ian; I love the descending coda.
"Singing All Day" is oftentimes miscalled by me "Swingin' All Day," since it out- grooves "Living," with its bloozy bass and mantra like, uh, singing. "Witch's Promise" is a gorgeous symphonic/folk song, the best early example of build that Ian hands us. "Inside" is the fast paced ballad off Benefit, so it's cool. "Just Trying to Be" is an almost lullaby like piece, much warmer than most the short, acoustic work Ian gives us.
So you're probably thinking to yourself, "Wow self. This Whistler chap really is a genius." Well, yes I am. But you might ALSO be thinking to yourself, "Wow self. This Living in the Past album appears to be immaculate. Can it do no wrong?" Well...of course it can. No album's one hundred percent perfect, and sadly, Living is about to do us wrong.
There are, as I alluded to earlier, two live tracks on the album, both recorded at Carnegie Hall. Wonder how Tull got in there...anyway, "By Kind Permission Of" is essentially an excuse for John Evan to show off. And he's good throughout, of course, and when the rest of the band joins in, it's great, they're a good live act. But it's just so LONG. "Dharma For One" wasn't that great of a number to begin with (This Was). The organ is a nice addition to the song, but I think I see why it was an instrumental to start with, and it's still just an excuse for Clive Bunker's boring drum solo...besides, I miss the claghorn.
The only real saving grace of the above live tracks is Ian's dialogue. Which is, for whatever reason, all over place (as in, confused, confusing, and seemingly pulled from two different shows). Still, the "This might contain contraband" speech at the start of "Permission" is classic. If only it were attached to better music...
The post Benefit stuff is a little colder. "Wond'ring Again" is a somewhat longer, more built up earlier version of Aqualung's "Wond'ring Aloud," with somewhat more political lyrics. Speaking of Aqualung, it's represented by "Locomotive Breath," which is an all time classic, of course.
"Life is a Long Song" is another build-over-time acoustic/symphonic piece, sort of like "Witch's Promise," only the flute overtones are traded for more orchestral heroics, so it loses the folksy edge. Still, the bridge towards the end of the song might be the nicest thing David Palmer ever composed.
"Up the 'Pool" is an enjoyable folksy, goofy pop rocker about Blackpool, Ian and the lads' ole stompin' ground. Nice choral section there. "Dr. Brogenbroom" is a forgotten classic, an organ opened psycho-rocker with sneering vocals, wah-wah guitar and manic, lyrical basslines from Jeffrey. "For Later" is a short instrumental of the loud and fast variety. Finally, the record closes with "Nurise," a beautiful, painful acoustic piece along the lines of "Cheap Day Return." No orchestra though.
So, Living in the Past is itself a beautiful, painful acoustic...and sometimes bloozy, sometimes folksy, sometimes rockin' album. The singles are all good, sometimes great. The album pieces are nothing you haven't heard before, but, oh darn, you just HAVE to listen to "Locomotive Breath" and "Song For Jeffrey" one more time, right? And, what the cheese, even the live stuff is...well, it's part of the album, damn it! You couldn't have Living in the Past without the crappy live tracks!
In the end, Living functions equally well as a compilation AND a "new material" album. It can also function as a kind of archive document, and I also consider it to be one of the best introductions to the band available. You know, aside from the fact that it's over an hour of music. Still, don't hesitate to pick it up! It's a compilation you can own absolutely guilt free.
(There is no remaster of Living in the Past, but there are some eighty different versions floating around, so what you hold in your hands might not be what I hold in mine. Other songs that may (or may not) find their way onto Living include: the "Bouree," the brilliant Bach-fusion off of Stand Up, "Teacher," a slow moving rocker with a nice chorus, "Alive and Well and Living In" a decent loud/soft rocker from Benefit, and "Hymn 43," a jumpin' piano rocker from Aqualung. All in all, whatever edition of Living in the Past you have will be good, even if it will still have those live tracks.)
The Whistler

A VERY ODD JETHRO TULL TREASURE
This is not a recording easy to review for diffeernt reasons:
1) The CD track list is not the same than on the original 2 LPS album. The LPs feature 21 tracks to the 19 you may find of the CD. Also, the LIVING IN THE PAST CD is the only one from the JETHRO TULL catalogue that has not been remastered. I thought, it would have been re-issued as a 2 CD set copying the original album. It hasn't happened yet!
2)there are NUMEROUS different versions of the original 2 LPs album; For example ,the tracklist from the PA review is different than mine. I do have LOCOMOTIVE BREATH on my version and the one here doesn't!
3) This was not considered a new original album when it came out,it was not a best-of or compilation either. You will find - almost all singles side 1 and 2 released back then -depending the different versions of the LPs - mostly absolute gems like the wonderful CHRISTMAS SONG, LOVE STORY or WITCH'S PROMISE. Also present are the hits SWEET DREAM and the title track, the sublime LIVING IN THE PAST and more. None of those songs were featured before on the original albums. - 2 live tracks BY KIND OF PERMISSION OF and DHARMA ONE taking a full LP side showing some kind of self indulgence well in the spirit of the time with a over-long JOHN EVAN piano solo on the first track and a good extended CLIVE BUNKER drums solo on DHARMA. I just hope you like extended drums solo!!! - 5 songs only released on an EP like the beautiful acoustic LIFE IS A LONG SONG , UP THE POOL or the hidden gem DR BROGENBROOM. - Some LPS hits to cover every angle of the JT production like BOURREE , LOCOMOTIVE BREATH and SONG FOR JEFFREY. -You even have a reworked version of WOND'RING ALOUD from AQUALUNG which become WOND'RING ALOUD on this album!
So i guess you find everything on LIVING IN THE PAST to please any TULL fan, especially early JETHRO TULL as the music covers the period 1968-1971 from TIME WAS to AQUALUNG. It gives you a perfect understanding of the multi-faceted sides of IAN ANDERSON and mates, and talent there is plenty of it galore!
Also it is worth adding that the original packaging of the 2 LPs set may have been one of the nicest ever made in the history of rock. It was more like a chic, very styled hard cover book than a simple LP cover, with its own gold lettering and a LP size very nice booklet inside: very classy indeed! People like to show off their coffee table books for decoration; LIVING IN THE PAST might be the first and only coffee table LPs i know.
With the releases of the new remastered JETHRO TULL , the importance of LIVING IN THE PAST is dwindling as most of tracks of this album, mostly the singles side A and B has been added to the original albums. Nevertheless, this is is great recording and wish it comes out one day in one of those japanese LPs reproduction CD!
Antoine

Greatest compilation in a history of rock.
Because it's not a compilation. At least I don't see it as one. Twenty-one track , and 15 of them previously unreleased (if I am right). Excuse me that looks like a more-or-less regular album to me. If we throw away the previously released tracks (for the sake of experiment), we got approximately one hour of previously unheard material!
Alright, I understand that all these songs were "compiled" from different JETHRO TULL periods. But what matters is: all those songs are great!!!!! And none of them is "jumping out" of the concept, content-wise or sound quality-wise. Indeed, this is great record that captured the best of that essential "Tullnes" and it stands tall among the other Tull's records of their golden era. I won't go into any details, because these songs need to be experienced. "Gorgeous" is the first word that springs to mind, I'm sure everyone will have lots of enjoyable moments while listening to these semi-acoustic, introspective gems.
Get it now. It's essential.
Moris Mateljan

This large compilation is made up of singles and songs that were left off the official albums of Jethro Tull's beginnings. Though it doesn't hold together as consistently as their official albums, it gives a nice run-through of the evolution in their first 4 years.
Though it is an entirely strong and enjoyable album, it shows a gradual slide from superb 1968 and 1969 singles towards more generic and less involved songwriting in the year 1971. For me it's another sign that their Aqualung period wasn't the peak of their beginnings but rather its nadir.
The best songs of this album feature on the 2001 re-issues of This Was, Stand Up and Benefit. This makes the 1971 songs the only remaining reason to purchase this album for. But as a collection of early Tull material this is still a sure 4 stars.
Karl Bonnek

When It was originally released Living In The Past was a great treat for JT fans. For the first time all their singles were compiled into a double album. it was very welcomed in places like Brazil, my homecountry, where JT singles were rarely available. Besides, most of the material were not included on their LPs and the addtion of two previous unreleased live tracks only made things even more atractive, to say the least! For some reason, however (maybe a teenager´s chronical lack of money in the 70´s) I didn´t hear that album until recently,. A good friend of ine gave me a bunch of Jethro Tull´s CDs that belonged originally to his brother some years before. I was more than happy to get them, even if those were not the new remasteres.
Living In The Past was among them, whch meant that this is the single CD version, that has four songs missing from the original collection: Boureé, Teacher, Alive And Well And Living In and Hymn 43. On the other hand tunes like Inside and Locomotive Breath that were not in the original package are included on the Cd, for reasons I do not know.
Is this colletion still worth? Well, since I don´t have the new remasters of the first albums (that now have much of these songs added as bonus tracks), it was a pleasure to have all those precious tunes in one single CD. The quality of the material is very high, proving that Ian Anderson was indeed one of the best songwriters to appear in the late 60´s. And Jethro Tull was also one hell of a great band, in its various incarnations. The live tracks are another story: incredibly they were the only official live recordings of a band famous for their stage perfomances. And even then they leave much to be desired: By Kind Permission Of is a solo piano piece done by John Evans, whcih is a meddley of several classical pieces put together, with the occasional flute intervention and the whole band appearing only in the final segment. Dharma For One is much better, with Ian Anderson writing lyrics for this original instrumental piece. But the perfomance is somewhat marred by a long drum solo. Still, until 1978´s Bursting Out, those were the only live samples the fans had from JT.
I still think that this CD is very well worth it´s price. If you don´t plan to buy every single remastered CD from their early days up to Aqualung, this is an excellent collection of JT´s singles up to that point. And they were many and very good. I was surprised by the high quality of the songs, even if the my CD edition has missing tracks, the booklet is poor, a joke compared to the original vinyl release, and the fact that those tunes were not yet remastered.
Conclusion: with all its faults, this record is still an excellent addition to any prog music collection.
Tarcisio Moura

Y hay un montón de comentarios más pero no jodan y llévense el disco que está bárbaro.



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Ideario del arte y política cabezona

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Autonautas de la Cosmoogpista...


Este espacio fue gestado con la intención de compartir sonidos, melodías que nos conmueven día a día, que nos reciben al abrir los ojos, quizás para muchos el primer contacto con la realidad, antes que un mate o un desayuno como la gente. Estos sonidos nos causan extremo placer y por eso queremos convidarles un poquito, para juntos escapar a la dominación del hemisferio izquierdo.
Pasen, vean, lleven lo que gusten. Pero si tienen la posibilidad de hacerse con el material tangible, no lo duden, es la forma que tenemos de colaborar con los artistas para que sigan creando.
Sí alguna persona o ente se siente ofendido por encontrar material en este sitio le rogamos nos lo haga saber, todavía creemos en las palabras.
Si por alguna razón no pueden leer estas lineas, usted ya no es, usted ya no existe, usted tiene un moog en la cabeza.


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Este espacio se reserva el derecho de publicar sobre cualquier tema que parezca interesante a su staff, no solamente referidos a la cuestión musical sino también a lo político y social.
Si no estás de acuerdo con lo expresado podrás dejar tu comentario siempre que no sea ofensivo, discriminador o violento...

Y no te confundas, no nos interesa la piratería, lo nuestro es simplemente desobediencia civil y resistencia cultural a favor del libre acceso al conocimiento (nuestra música es, entre otras tantas cosas, conocimiento).

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Lo más visto de la semana pasada

Tool - Fear Inoculum (2019)

Biblioteca sonora. Sorpresa. Mago Alberto. Recién salido. Incógnita. Publicado. Sin escuchar aún. Sin comentarios. Sin reviews. Nuevo Tool. Fear Inoculum. Nuevo logo. Material clasificado. Patada en el culo. Ropas desgarradas. Nuevo sonido. Fans enojados. Mentes abiertas. Estado de atención. Nueva oportunidad. Nueva actitud. Alteración. Sorpresa sin sorpresas. Sorpresa multiplicada. Edición Deluxe. Tres temas extra. Cero opinión. Disrrupción. Intriga. ¿Ocaso?. ¿Renacimiento?. Alternativa. Desafío. Oprobio y quizás nueva gloria. Quizás. Todo ello igual a lo nuevo de Tool.

Artista: Tool
Álbum: Fear Inoculum
Año: 2019
Género: Heavy prog
Nacionalidad: EEUU


Siguen siendo grandiosos, únicos y especiales. Para mí valió la pena esperar 13 años para que aparecieran estos nuevos 80 minutos de verdadera música, cargada de la madurez, virtuosismo y calidad que caracterizan a TOOL, que a mi común, humilde y ordinario criterio, produjeron un trabajo musical PERFECTO Y A LA ALTURA. Totalmente satisfecho …

King Crimson - Improvisaciones 1972-1974

Dedicado a la memoria de John Wetton (1949 - 2017)
Podríamos decir que King Crimson ocupa un lugar primordial entre las formaciones que surgieron en el llamado rock progresivo de finales de los 60 y comienzos de los 70, pero la realidad es que este grupo siempre estuvo un paso o dos por delante y dificilmente cabe la comparación  con ninguno de ellos. Pese a que la crítica especializada no fue inicialmente unánime respecto al valor de esta banda, rápidamente lograron un enorme prestigio entre los aficionados y lo han mantenido a lo largo de todas sus diferentes formaciones, aglutinando hasta el día de hoy, cuando aun sigue activa, una base de seguidores muy fieles (por no decir fanáticos) integrada ya por varias generaciones. Sería muy ambicioso para el que escribe tratar toda su carrera, así que por eso de concretar dentro de una discografía tan dilatada y compleja, quisiera centrarme en este artículo en su etapa 1972-1974, periodo de relativa tranquilidad (s…

Alejandro Dolina - Elogio De La Tristeza

"Los vendedores de elixir nos convidan todos los días a olvidar las penas y mantener jubiloso el ánimo. El Pensamiento Oficial del Mundo ha decidido que una persona alegre es preferible a una triste. Cuanto más inteligente, profunda y sensible es una persona, más probabilidades tiene de cruzarse con la tristeza. Por eso, las exhortaciones a la alegría suelen proponer la interrupción del pensamiento: "es mejor no pensar...". No está mal ser triste, señora. El que se entristece se humilla, se rebaja, abandona el orgullo. Quien está triste se ensimisma, piensa. La tristeza es hija y madre de la meditación. Aprovecho para confesarle que suelo elegir a mis amigos entre la gente triste. Y no vaya a creer que nuestras reuniones consisten en charlas lacrimógenas. Nada de eso: concurrimos a bailongos atorrantes, amanecemos en lugares desconocidos, cantamos canciones puercas, nos enamoramos de mujeres desvergonzadas que revolean el escote y hacemos sonar los timbres de las casas …

Grobschnitt - Solar Music Live (1978)

Revivimos esta semana las andanzas de un grupo muy poco conocido pero maravillosamente disfrutable, una semana donde presentaremos algunas maravillosas cosas de Grobschnitt, desde Alemania llega con su mezcla única de Krautrock + rock sinfónico + space rock + rock psicodélico, en un disco absolutamente fascinante. Otra obra maestra musical absolutamente imprescindible que damos a conocer en nuestro querido blog cabezón. Revivimos este disco ya presentado hace tiempo, y vamos a seguir en esta semana con más Grobschnitt, sobretodo porque todo esto es muy recomendado!.

Artista: Grobschnitt Álbum: Solar Music Live
Año: 1978
Género: Krautrock ecléctico / Rock sinfónico
Duración: 68:47
Nacionalidad: Alemania

Nano nos reseña un disco que nos comparte él mismo: una genial banda alemana combinando el krautrock con el rock sinfónico, el space rock y el rock psicodélico, y creando un tremendísimo disco. Y como comentario aparte del estrictamente musical, vemos como en el blog cabezón no solamente …

La Revolución De La Alegría...

Globos pinchados: Cuatro años del Felino Macri y su revolución de la alegría prometida dejan sus consecuencias. La consultora Ipsos Global Advisor realizó un estudio para medir la felicidad en 28 países, llamado "Global Happiness 2019", y la posición que logró Argentina fue, al menos llamativa. Nuestro país se quedó con el "mérito" de ser el más infeliz del mundo y apenas el 34% de los adultos que participaron de la encuesta afirmó estar contento. Cabe destacar que el trabajo estudió diferentes ítems para saber el grado de satisfacción con la dirección de su vida, el bienestar de su familia y su entorno así como el estado de la economía. Hace tres años y medio, las respuestas fueron inversas con la misma consultora. Argentina estaba entre los país más felices del mundo.
Pasó Mauricio Macri y su equipo, nada menos.


Una investigación global dejó al descubierto que gracias a la gestión amarilla los argentinos ya somos el pueblo más infeliz del planeta. Según reveló I…

Pink Floyd. The Wall, collage 360. Edición Rockarte

Billy Cobham - Spectrum 40 Live (2015)

Vamos cerrando otra semana cabezona llena de sorpresas, grandes discos, reseñas de mierda pero hechas con buena intención y nuestra típica gana de meter el dedo en la llaga y joder con nuestro punto de vista sobre esos temas sociales que nos joden a todos. Y para cerrar la semanita a lo grande, el Mago Alberto les deja un disco especial, de uno de los bateristas más prominentes que ha dado la humanidad, asociado generalmente a la gran banda Mahavishnu Orchestra pero que ha tocado con todos los más grandes. Aquí, reviviendo a su gran obra "Spectrum" 40 años después y en vivo, y para continuar les copio el texto que nos entrega el Mago: "Cuando Spectrum asomó al mundo produjo un efecto multiplicador indescriptible, y se transformó en una de las obras más influyentes del género, ya nada sería igual para los bateristas y guitarristas (...) Un álbum bisagra, un disco para el asombro, un imprescindible, un tesoro musical imposible de describir. Luego de cuatro décadas Billy C…

Jazz: Creado por Negros. Comercializado por Blancos

El jazz lo crearon los negros y lo comercializaron los blancos. Hace unos 100 años, el 26 de febrero de 1917, el sello Victor Records grabó el primer disco de jazz de la historia. Para muchos los temas "Dixieland Jass Band One Step" y "Livery Stable Blues" de la Original Dixieland Jazz Band (ODJB), fueron las primeras piezas de jazz que escucharon. El álbum vendió un millón de copias, dando paso a una explosión musical y cultural. Hoy el jazz es el estilo de música menos vendido en Estados Unidos, en un mercado discográfico deprimido, hasta el punto de que habría motivos para preguntarse sobre la efemérides. ¿A quién le importa todo esto?Pues sí importa recordarlo, y mucho. Como tantas otras expresiones artísticas, el jazz es una creación del pueblo oprimido, explotado y humillado. Sí, ese mismo al que todos los señoritos desprecian por ignorante o embrutecido.

Como toda creación popular, el jazz fue luego robado; tan robado que quisieron que su origen no hubiera s…

Hugh Hopper & Kramer - A Remark Hugh Made (1994)

El Mago Alberto nos trae al gran Hugh Hopper (violero de nada más y nada menos que Soft Machine) que se une a Mark Kramer (un bocho que es músico multi instrumentista, compositor, productor discográfico y fundador de un sello discográfico, aunque no sea demasiado conocido, pero aquí deja en claro su calidad musical). A ellos se les suma el enorme Robert Wyatt (me imagino que no hace falta presentarlo), Randolph A. Hudson III (que acompañó a Kramer en varios proyectos, como Bongwater y los discos solistas de Kramer, y otros con Hugh Hopper), Gary Windo (enorme saxofonista cercano al Avant-Garde, y que aquí deja impresa la calidad en su ejecución), y Bill Bacon en batería (Daevid Allen, Material, Flying Island, Kramer, Gilli Smyth, Michael Zentner, etc.). Todos arman este combo compuesto por 13 eclécticos temas donde no les faltará nada. Una sorporesita bien para que conozcan en el fin de semana... A disfrutar!

Artista: Hugh Hopper & Kramer
Álbum: A Remark Hugh Made
Año: 1994
Género:

Rayuela - Rayuela (1978)

Empezamos la semana recordando un buen disco que nos trae Desjer. Gran disco casi desconocido y que nos enorgullece decir que hemos presentado a la comunidad ya hace tiempo pero que viene bien repasarlo cuando hace poco estuvimos rememorando los discos de Arco Iris, ya que su historia está muy emparentada con la de la banda Soluna (imagino que saben de que hablo, me refiero al grupo de Santaolalla y compañía). Desarrollan en el álbum estilos que van desde baladas bellamente instrumentadas hasta fusión de jazz y rock, coronado con temas de intenciones claramente progresivas con toques sinfónicos y folcklóricos.  En definitiva, si no lo conocés, te invito a que juegues un buen rato a la Rayuela.


Artista: Rayuela
Álbum: Rayuela
Año: 1978
Género: Folk-rock, Jazz rock
Duración: 37:39
Nacionalidad: Argentina


Tomando como nombre a una de las novelas más conocidas del genial Julio Cortázar, en un estilo influenciado por el rock sinfónico, el folk y el jazz-rock (propuestas musicales bien diferent…

Unordered List

"La desobediencia civil es el derecho imprescriptible de todo ciudadano. No puede renunciar a ella sin dejar de ser un hombre".

Gandhi, Tous les hommes sont frères, Gallimard, 1969, p. 235.

Entradas populares de este blog

Denuncia en Primera Persona. El Desprecio a la Discapacidad

Quizás el rostro más duro y paradigmático de la política se pueda captar con precisión con las personas más vulnerables de la sociedad y el respeto que reciben por parte del poder político. Y esto va mucho más allá de las ideologías: es simple humanidad, o anti-humanidad. Aquí nos deja su mensaje, reclamo y denuncia nuestra amiga cabezona Natalia, quien partiendo de su historia personal, toca la problemática de la precarización laboral existente en el Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires en general, y repasando las actuales dificultades para la obtención del Certificado Único de Discapacidad, enfatizando la necesidad del pase a planta permanente de las y los integrantes del colectivo que actualmente se encuentran precarizados. Los datos demuestran que la crisis afecta de manera más significativa a las personas que pertenecen a colectivos que ya venían sufriendo discriminación. Por eso la crisis también ha empeorado las condiciones laborales y sociales de las personas con discapacidad…

Esbjorn Svensson Trio - Live In Hamburg (2007)

Artista: Esbjorn Svensson Trio Álbum: Live In Hamburg
Año:2007
Género: Jazz
Duración: 1:58
Nacionalidad: Suecia
Lista de Temas:
1. "Tuesday Wonderland"
2. "The Rube Thing"
3. "Where We Used To Live", 
4. "Eighthundred Streets By Feet"
5. "Definition Of A Dog"
6. "The Goldhearted Miner"
7. "Dolores In A Shoestand"
8. "Sipping On The Solid Ground"
9. "Goldwrap"
10."Behind The Yashmak"
Alineación:
Esbjörn Svensson / Piano
Dan Berglund / Contrabajo
Magnus Öström / Batería
Lino, nuestro cabezón venezolano, se pega una vuelta por el blog y resube este buen disco de jazz contemporáneo. Si te gusta el jazz, no dudes de escuchar este trabajo. Gracias Lino!

Las 100 Mejores Canciones del Prog

Aquí, las 100 mejores canciones de rock progresivo de todos los tiempos, según la revista "Prog". Y aunque habitualmente no le damos bola a la lista de mejores discos o canciones de rock progresivo de la historia ofrecida por algunos portales, webs y demás publicaciones, quizás está bueno darle importancia a la lista que ofrece ahora la revista "Prog" (esa misma que da los premios que mencionamos el otro día) ya que es armada según la opinión de gran parte de su público. En concreto, la revista "Prog" ofrece un total de 100 canciones y la lista la ha elaborado a partir de una encuesta muy trabajada donde han participado tanto lectores como expertoso, artistas y autores de música consultados por la publicación. Una recopilación de lo más compleja que creo merece la pena.

Aquí está la lista de las mejores canciones de rock progresivo del puesto 100 al 1:

100) Inca Roads - Frank Zappa & The Mothers Of Invention
99) The Life Auction - Strawbs
98) In The Ca…

La Barranca - Eclipse de memoria (2013)

Artista: La Barranca
Álbum: Eclipse de memoria
Año: 2013
Género: Rock poético mexicano
Duración: 45:04
Nacionalidad: México

Lista de Temas:
01. El alma nunca deja de sentir
02. Ante la ley
03. Garzas
04. Flores de invierno
05. En cada movimiento
06. La tercera joya desde el sol
07. El futuro más distante
08. Campos de batalla
09. Sequía
10. Siempre joven
11. El tiempo es olvido


Alineación:
- Federico Fong / bajo, piano, percusión.
- José Manuel Aguilera / voz, guitarras, órgano, charango.
- Adolfo Romero / guitarras.
- Navi Naas / batería.
Invitados;
Enrique Castro / marimba, percusión, piano, kalimba.
Alfonso André / batería.
Cecilia Toussaint / coros.
Yamil Rezc / percusión, juno, batería.
Agustín Bernal / contrabajo.
Darío González / rhodes, mellotron, hammond.
Daniel Zlotnik / sax soprano, sax tenor, flauta, hulusi.
Erick Rodríguez / trombón.
César Barreiro / trompeta.
Magali / piano.
Mónica del Águila Cortés / cello.
Arturo González Viveros / violín.
Erika Ramírez Sánchez / viola.

Y ya p…

Tool - Fear Inoculum (2019)

Biblioteca sonora. Sorpresa. Mago Alberto. Recién salido. Incógnita. Publicado. Sin escuchar aún. Sin comentarios. Sin reviews. Nuevo Tool. Fear Inoculum. Nuevo logo. Material clasificado. Patada en el culo. Ropas desgarradas. Nuevo sonido. Fans enojados. Mentes abiertas. Estado de atención. Nueva oportunidad. Nueva actitud. Alteración. Sorpresa sin sorpresas. Sorpresa multiplicada. Edición Deluxe. Tres temas extra. Cero opinión. Disrrupción. Intriga. ¿Ocaso?. ¿Renacimiento?. Alternativa. Desafío. Oprobio y quizás nueva gloria. Quizás. Todo ello igual a lo nuevo de Tool.

Artista: Tool
Álbum: Fear Inoculum
Año: 2019
Género: Heavy prog
Nacionalidad: EEUU


Siguen siendo grandiosos, únicos y especiales. Para mí valió la pena esperar 13 años para que aparecieran estos nuevos 80 minutos de verdadera música, cargada de la madurez, virtuosismo y calidad que caracterizan a TOOL, que a mi común, humilde y ordinario criterio, produjeron un trabajo musical PERFECTO Y A LA ALTURA. Totalmente satisfecho …

Egberto Gismonti & Naná Vasconcelos - Duas Vozes (1985)

Artista: Egberto Gismonti & Naná Vasconcelos Álbum: Duas Vozes
Año: 1985
Género: Jazz Fusión / Latin Jazz
Nacionalidad: Brasil

Lista de Temas:
1. Aquarela do Brasil
2. Rio de Janeiro
3. Tomarapeba
4. Dancando
5. Fogueira
6. Bianca
7. Don Quixote
8. O Dia, À Noite

Alineación:
- Egberto Gismonti / guitar, piano, dilruba, wood flutes, voice
- Naná Vasconcelos / percussion, berimbau, voice



Robert Dimery, Editor - 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die (2006)

Libro de referencia de la música pop aparecida entre 1955 y 2005, abarcando los géneros desde el rock, blues, folk, jazz, pop, electrónica y world music. Las reseñas fueron realizadas por un equipo de unos 90 críticos de distintas latitudes y gustos. El trabajo se basa en discos originales, quedando así por fuera las recopilaciones de varios artistas, quedando excluido así, el mítico álbum de Woodstock. Sin embargo el panorama es muy amplio y uno siempre encontrará artistas que no ha oído.

Editor: Robert Dimery Prefacio: Michael Lydon
Primera Edición: 2005
Cubierta:Jon Wainwright
Género: Catálogo
Páginas: 960
Nacionalidad: EEUU Editorial:Universe Publishing
Reediciones:2008, 2011, 2013 Otros Idiomas: español, portugués, noruego, finés, sueco, y otros.



Presentación del Editor de libros de Amazon.com 

The ultimate compendium of a half century of the best music, now revised and updated.1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die is a highly readable list of the best, the most important, and the most in…

La Barranca - Denzura (2002)

Artista: La Barranca
Álbum: Denzura
Año: 2002
Género: Rock alternativo
Nacionalidad: México

Lista de Temas:
01. fascinacion
02. animal en extincion
03. hasta el fin del mundo
04. donde la demasiada luz forma paredes con el polvo
05. la vision
06. no mentalices
07. denzura
08. montana
09. la rosa
10. madreselva
11. minotauro
12. kalenda maya

bonus ep: cielo protector
13. cielo protector
14. rendicion
15. tsunami
16. el agua que cae
17. cielo protector (demo)


Alineación:
- José Manuel Aguilera / guitarra, voz, órgano
- Alejandro Otáloa / guitarra, piano, teclados
- José María Arréola / batería
- Alonso Arréola / bajo, guitarra acústica
Músicos Invitados:
Federico Fong - piano eléctrico (6)
Cecilia Toussaint - voces femenina (2,10)
Marco Antonio Campos - percusiones (2, 4, 9, 10)
Joe D'Etiene - trompeta (8 )
Cherokee Randalph - viola (3, 6, 7)
Mónica del Aguila - chelo (3, 7, 6)
José del Aguila - violín (3, 6, 7)
Arturo González - violín (3, 6, 7)
Eduardo del Aguila - platillo tibetano (1)

Manantial - Manantial (1977)

Nuestro amigo Julio Moya sigue con su tarea de palentólogo del rock latinoamericano y ahora nos presenta la historia de Manantial, algo así como los Arco Iris de Bolivia (incluso en su historia hay puntos de contacto con la banda de Santaolalla). Manantial fue una de las bandas mas representativas del rock boliviano producido en la decada setentera, con una clara influencia inclinada al rock progresivo y experimental, creando una verdadera joya perdida del rock boliviano (no van a encontrar referencia alguna por ningún lado de esto, salvo lo escrito por el cabezón Julio) que ahora presentamos en el blog cabezón gracias al trabajo investigativo de Julio Moya.

Artista: Manantial
Álbum: Manantial
Año: 1977
Género: Rock progresivo / Rock psicodélico
Nacionalidad: Bolivia


Este tiempo Julio estuvo viajando de lado a lado, ahora se encuentra en Bolivia consiguiendo material para "Años Luz", y nos deja la reseña de este disco, una nueva banda que damos a conocer en el blog cabezón, una …

Argentina Kamikaze

La Fiesta Amarilla (a la que no estás invitado, dicho sea de paso) sigue su curso y no va a parar hasta el iceberg. Después de los tristes anuncios desmentidos sobre los horizontes inflacionarios de 2018 llegan las primeras atenciones del gobierno PRO para con sus gobernados y a partir del 1 de febrero (2018) rigen los primeros aumentos del año: boletos de colectivos, boletos de trenes, facturas de luz, facturas de gas, medicina prepaga y peajes. Aumenta todo menos tus ingresos.

Hoy entran en vigencia los tarifazos del transporte (colectivo 32% y tren 35%), luz (24%) y prepagas (4%). Decisiones que afectan a la mayoría de los argentinos de un gobierno de empresarios en un año no electoral. Casualmente.
La catarata de aumentos tiene impacto no sólo en los bolsillos sino también en los índices de inflación, lo cual complica de entrada el cumplimiento de la meta de inflación anual que puso del Banco Central, del 15%. Según las estimaciones de las consultoras, el avance de los precios pod…